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October 2021

Tuesday, 26 October 2021 00:00

Post-surgical Care For Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are nails whose edges that have grown into the surrounding skin. This may cause the area to become red, swollen, tender, and painful, and puts you at an increased risk of getting an infection. In severe cases, an ingrown toenail may need to be surgically removed. Following a surgery for ingrown toenails, you should rest and elevate the affected foot for 12 to 24 hours. Over the counter medications can be used to manage pain. Two days after your surgery, you can begin to soak your foot in warm, soapy water several times a day. Following the soak, apply an antibiotic ointment and cover the area with a clean bandage. For more information about treatments for ingrown toenails, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Robert Graser of Graser Podiatry and Bunion Surgery Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Boerne, Hondo, and Devine, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

How Does the Cuboid Bone Become Displaced?

Cuboid syndrome, also called cuboid subluxation, occurs when the cuboid bone in the midfoot is displaced. This can happen when the tendons that support the cuboid are injured, usually because of repetitive overuse. The injured or torn tendons pull on the cuboid bone, moving it from its usual position. This produces symptoms such as pain on the outer side of the foot, tenderness, swelling, weakness, and difficulty walking. Cuboid syndrome often occurs following an ankle sprain, and frequently affects dancers, jumpers, sprinters, or anyone who regularly places a great deal of pressure on their feet. For more information about cuboid syndrome, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Robert Graser from Graser Podiatry and Bunion Surgery Institute. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Boerne, Hondo, and Devine, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Helping Your Child’s Feet Smell Better

Foot odor is caused by bacteria that feasts on oils and dead skin cells. These bacteria can collect and multiply easily in damp and dark places like sweaty shoes, socks, and sweaty feet, and then produce odorous organic acids during their process of dispelling waste. For some people, the type of bacteria they collect is called Kyetococcus sedentarius, which also produces volatile sulfur compounds and can be excessively rank. A key to avoiding or reducing putrid-smelling feet is keeping the feet as dry and clean as possible. Make sure your child washes their feet every day and especially after physical activity that causes them to sweat. Get them moisture-wicking socks that keep sweat off the skin and allow the feet to breathe. Check to make sure they wear fresh socks every day as well. Ensure that the shoes they wear are not too tight, and switch out shoes and sneakers every day to allow them to dry out before wearing them again. Don’t allow them to share footwear, socks, or towels with anyone. If you believe your child’s feet sweat excessively, they may have a condition known as hyperhidrosis which can be treated by a podiatrist who can also offer additional tips on foot hygiene and care.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Dr. Robert Graser of Graser Podiatry and Bunion Surgery Institute. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Boerne, Hondo, and Devine, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 06 October 2021 00:00

Peripheral Artery Disease Explained

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a medical condition that can cause poor circulation in the lower limbs. This occurs due to a buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries that supply the lower limbs. The plaque causes arteries to narrow and harden, making it more difficult for blood to travel through them and bring oxygen and nutrients to the feet and ankles. In its early stages, PAD may be asymptomatic. As it progresses, symptoms can include foot and leg cramps, numbness, weakness, coldness, skin discoloration, hair loss, and slow-healing sores and wounds on the lower limbs. Your podiatrist can screen you for PAD through a variety of simple, noninvasive tests. If you suspect that you may have PAD, or if you are an older adult or have a family history of vascular disease, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist for a PAD screening. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Robert Graser from Graser Podiatry and Bunion Surgery Institute. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Boerne, Hondo, and Devine, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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